LATIN 8 / LATIN I

Course Description

Latin 8 / Latin I is designed to be an introduction to the world of the ancient Romans. The student will learn how the Romans spoke, through the reading of their language, how they lived, through the examination of their everyday activities, and what they believed, through the study of their myths and religions. The student will be expected to read and translate Latin stories and dialogues, to master the essential grammar points, declensions and conjugations introduced in the course, to memorize a basic Latin vocabulary, and to translate simple English sentences into Latin. The student will also be expected to acquire a basic knowledge of the customs, daily activities, education, recreation, government and religions of the ancient Romans. Also included in the course will be the study of English derivatives from Latin and a comparison of Latin and English grammar.

  

Knowledge and Skills

  • How to read and translate Latin at a level involving compound and/or complex sentences.

  • How to identify, create, and translate the various forms of nouns, adjectives, adverbs, pronouns, and verbs introduces in Latin 8 / Latin I.

  • How to recognize and translate the different grammatical constructions introduced in Latin 8 / Latin I.

  • How to use contextual hints to achieve an understanding of a passage/story in Latin.

  • How, through the study of Latin grammar, to better understand English grammar rules.

  • How to recognize the difference between an inflected and an uninflected language and the advantages and disadvantages of each.

 

Texts and Thematic Units of Study

Cambridge Latin Course, Unit 1, North American 4th edition

Cambridge Latin Course, Unit 2, North American 4th edition

 

THE FORUM

This unit focuses on the forum in Pompeii, its function as the center of business, religion and politics, and the most important building within it. The unit also discusses fora in other locales in the Roman world and the idea of the forum as an integral part of a Roman city/town.

 

THE THEATERS IN POMPEII

This unit introduces the two theaters in Pompeii: their structure and major elements, and the types of popular entertainment presented in them. Also discussed are the nature of the dress and masks of the actors and the influence of Greek comedy on many of the plays performed in the theaters.

 

SLAVES AND FREEDMEN

The focus of this unit is an in-depth study of the institution of slavery in the ancient, especially Roman, world: its origins, the sale and treatment of slaves, attitudes of free Romans concerning the institution. Also in this unit is a brief comparison between slavery in the Roman world and in this country prior to the Civil War.

 

ROMAN BELIEFS ABOUT LIFE AFTER DEATH

In this unit, students are introduced to various beliefs centering around death and the afterlife: where a person's spirit goes after death and what happens to it, rituals connected with burial, the belief in ghosts. Also discussed are methods and locations of burials. 

 

GLADIATORS AND AMPHITHEATERS

The focus of this unit is on 1)gladiators: who became gladiators, what types of gladiators there were, what transpired in the course of a gladiatorial contest, 2)amphitheaters: the essential make-up of the two types of Roman amphitheaters and how each type attempted to manage crowd control and the movement of animals into the arena. 

 

THE BATHS

This unit deals with the Roman baths, both in Pompeii and in Rome, looking at the physical make-up of bathing complexes and activities that took place within those complexes.

 

EDUCATION

In this unit, the essentials of education in the Roman world are discussed. Students learn about the stages of education, what is taught in each stage, and who teaches each stage. Also discussed are 1)who received an education 2)the goals of education, and 3)the role of technical subjects in Roman education.

 

LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND ELECTIONS

The focus of this unit is the system of goverment in Pompeii, in particular, and the Roman world, in general. Discussed are the duties and expectations of elected officials and the nature of the election process.

 

THE DESTRUCTION AND EXCAVATION OF POMPEII

This unit examines the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79A.D., the effects of the eruption on Pompeii and other locales in the area, the history of excavations of those locales, and the threat of future eruptions of Vesuvius.

 

ROMAN BRITAIN: AN INTRODUCTION

In this unit, with the destruction of Pompeii in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, the story line shifts to Roman Britain. Students are introduced to a new venue with a new set of characters, very much different from those encountered in earlier units. The focus of this unit is on the slaves living on an estate in southern England and their activities.

 

LIFE IN ROMAN BRITAIN

This unit discusses the lifestyles of both Romans new to Britain and native Celts in regard to their dwellings and occupations. The story line focuses in part on the roles of slaves imported by wealthier Romans into a recently acquired province.

 

THE ROMAN INVASION OF BRITAIN 

This unit is a historical presentation of the Roman invasion of Britain, which had a long-lasting influence on the island, both on the physical nature of towns and cities and the lives of the inhabitants. There is also an emphasis on the process of Romanization as a means to pacify the natives of new province. Also discussed is how the Romans attempted to control their provinces in light of the necessity to employ their legions in maintaining the borders of their Empire.

 

Student Expectations

CLASSROOM RULES

  • Be Prompt

  • Be Prepared

  • Be Polite

  • Be Productive

 

GRADING 

  • Participation/Translation 30%

  • Quizzes 30%

  • Tests 30%

  • Projects 10%

 

© 2013 by MAGISTRA BROWER. All rights reserved.

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